Direct and indirect effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with cardiomyopathy

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Title: Direct and indirect effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with cardiomyopathy
Authors: Hammersley, D
Buchan, R
Lota, A
Mach, L
Jones, R
Halliday, B
Tayal, U
Meena, D
Dehghan, A
Tzoulaki, I
Baksi, A
Pantazis, A
Roberts, A
Prasad, S
Ware, J
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Objectives: (i) To evaluate the prevalence and hospitalisation rate of COVID-19 infections amongst patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in the Royal Brompton & Harefield Hospital Cardiovascular Research Centre (RBHH CRC) Biobank. (ii) To evaluate the indirect impact of the pandemic on patients with cardiomyopathy through the Heart Hive COVID-19 study. (iii) To assess the impact of the pandemic on national cardiomyopathy-related hospital admissions. Methods: (i) 1,236 patients (703 DCM, 533 HCM) in the RBHH CRC Biobank were assessed for COVID-19 infections and hospitalisations; ii) 207 subjects (131 cardiomyopathy, 76 without heart disease) in the Heart Hive COVID-19 study completed online surveys evaluating physical health, psychological wellbeing, and behavioural adaptations during the pandemic; (iii) 11,447 cardiomyopathy-related hospital admissions across NHS England were studied from NHS Digital Hospital Episode Statistics over 2019-2020. Results: A comparable proportion of patients with cardiomyopathy in the RBHH CRC Biobank had tested positive for COVID-19 compared with the UK population (1.1% vs 1.6%, p=0.14), but a higher proportion of those infected were hospitalised (53.8% vs 16.5%, p=0.002). In the Heart Hive COVID-19 study, more patients with cardiomyopathy felt their physical health had deteriorated due to the pandemic than subjects without heart disease (32.3% vs 13.2%, p=0.004) despite only 4.6% of the cardiomyopathy cohort reporting COVID-19 symptoms. A 17.9% year-on-year reduction in national cardiomyopathy-related hospital admissions was observed in 2020. Conclusion: Patients with cardiomyopathy had similar reported rates of testing positive for COVID-19 to the background population, but those with test-proven infection were hospitalised more frequently. Deterioration in physical health amongst patients could not be explained by COVID-19 symptoms, inferring a significant contribution of the indirect consequences of the pandemic.
Issue Date: 27-Jan-2022
Date of Acceptance: 4-Jan-2022
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/96212
DOI: 10.1136/openhrt-2021-001918
ISSN: 2053-3624
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Start Page: 1
End Page: 9
Journal / Book Title: Open Heart
Volume: 9
Issue: 1
Copyright Statement: © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2022. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
Sponsor/Funder: Wellcome Trust
British Heart Foundation
British Heart Foundation
British Heart Foundation
National Heart & Lung Institute Foundation
Sir Jules Thorn Charitable Trust
Funder's Grant Number: 107469/Z/15/Z
RE/18/4/34215
FS/ICRF/21/26019
SP/17/11/32885
N/A
21 JTA
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems
Cardiovascular System & Cardiology
CARDIOLOGY
STATEMENT
ESC
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems
Cardiovascular System & Cardiology
COVID-19
cardiomyopathies
delivery of health care
COVID-19
Cardiomyopathy, Dilated
Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic
Comorbidity
Emotional Adjustment
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services Needs and Demand
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Mental Health
Middle Aged
Prevalence
SARS-CoV-2
State Medicine
Survival Analysis
United Kingdom
Humans
Cardiomyopathy, Dilated
Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic
Hospitalization
Prevalence
Survival Analysis
Mental Health
Comorbidity
Middle Aged
Health Services Needs and Demand
State Medicine
Health Services Accessibility
Female
Male
Emotional Adjustment
United Kingdom
COVID-19
SARS-CoV-2
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2022-01-27
Appears in Collections:National Heart and Lung Institute
Institute of Clinical Sciences
Faculty of Medicine
Imperial College London COVID-19
School of Public Health



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