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A population-based follow-up study shows high psychosis risk in women with PCOS

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Title: A population-based follow-up study shows high psychosis risk in women with PCOS
Authors: Karjula, S
Arffman, RK
Morin-Papunen, L
Franks, S
Jarvelin, M-R
Tapanainen, JS
Miettunen, J
Piltonen, TT
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder affecting up to 18% of women. Besides metabolic and fertility aspects, attention has lately been directed towards the detrimental effect of PCOS on psychological health. The objective of the study was to investigate whether women with PCOS are at higher risk for psychotic disorders. The study population derives from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (N = 5889 women). The women with PCOS were identified by two simple questions on oligo-amenorrhea and hirsutism at age 31. Women reporting both symptoms were considered PCOS (N = 124) and asymptomatic women as controls (N = 2145). The diagnosis of psychosis was traced using multiple national registers up to the year 2016. Symptoms of psychopathology were identified using validated questionnaires at age 31. Women with PCOS showed an increased risk for any psychosis by age 50 (HR [95% CI] 2.99, [1.52–5.82]). Also, the risk for psychosis after age 31 was increased (HR 2.68 [1.21–5.92]). The results did not change after adjusting for parental history of psychosis, nor were they explained by body mass index or hyperandrogenism at adulthood. The scales of psychopathology differed between women with PCOS and non-PCOS controls showing more psychopathologies among the affected women. PCOS cases were found to be at a three-fold risk for psychosis, and they had increased psychopathological symptoms. PCOS should be taken into consideration when treating women in psychiatric care. More studies are required to further assess the relationship between PCOS and psychotic diseases.
Issue Date: 1-Apr-2022
Date of Acceptance: 9-Nov-2021
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/93457
DOI: 10.1007/s00737-021-01195-4
ISSN: 1434-1816
Publisher: Springer
Start Page: 301
End Page: 311
Journal / Book Title: Archives of Womens Mental Health
Volume: 25
Copyright Statement: © The Author(s) 2021. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
Polycystic ovary syndrome
PCOS
Psychosis
Hirsutism
Testosterone
POLYCYSTIC-OVARY-SYNDROME
OLIGOMENORRHEA AND/OR HIRSUTISM
SELF-REPORTED SYMPTOMS
SEX-DIFFERENCES
WEIGHT-GAIN
SCHIZOPHRENIA
PREVALENCE
DISORDERS
CARE
ESTROGEN
Hirsutism
PCOS
Polycystic ovary syndrome
Psychosis
Testosterone
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hirsutism
Humans
Hyperandrogenism
Middle Aged
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Psychotic Disorders
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
Polycystic ovary syndrome
PCOS
Psychosis
Hirsutism
Testosterone
POLYCYSTIC-OVARY-SYNDROME
OLIGOMENORRHEA AND/OR HIRSUTISM
SELF-REPORTED SYMPTOMS
SEX-DIFFERENCES
WEIGHT-GAIN
SCHIZOPHRENIA
PREVALENCE
DISORDERS
CARE
ESTROGEN
Psychiatry
1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2021-11-29
Appears in Collections:Department of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction
Faculty of Medicine



This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons