Prevalence and clinical significance of occult hepatitis B infection in The Gambia, West Africa.

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Title: Prevalence and clinical significance of occult hepatitis B infection in The Gambia, West Africa.
Authors: Ndow, G
Cessay, A
Cohen, D
Shimakawa, Y
Gore, ML
Tamba, S
Ghosh, S
Sanneh, B
Baldeh, I
Njie, R
D'Alessandro, U
Mendy, M
Thursz, M
Chemin, I
Lemoine, M
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Prevalence of occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) and its clinical outcomes have been poorly studied in Africa. METHOD: Using the PROLIFICA cohort, we compared the prevalence of OBI between HBsAg-negative healthy adults screened from the general population (controls) and HBsAg-negative patients with advanced liver disease (cases) and estimated the population attributable fraction for the effect of OBI on advanced liver disease. RESULTS: OBI prevalence was significantly higher among the cases (15/82, 18.3%) than in the control group (31/330, 9.4%, p=0.03). Among participants with OBI, pre-S2 mutations were detected in 5/31 (16.1%) controls and 3/14 (21.4%) cases (p=0.7).After adjusting for age, sex, and anti-HCV serology, OBI was significantly associated with advanced liver disease [OR: 2.8 (95% CI: 1.3-6.0), p=0.006]. In HBsAg-negative people, the proportions of advanced liver disease cases attributable to OBI and HCV were estimated at 12.9% (7.5-18.1%) and 16.9% (15.2-18.6%), respectively. CONCLUSION: OBI is endemic and an independent risk factor of advanced liver disease in The Gambia, West Africa. This implies that HBsAg-negative people with liver disease should be systematically screened for OBI. Moreover, the impact of infant hepatitis B immunization to prevent end-stage liver disease might be higher than previous estimates based solely on HBsAg-positivity.
Issue Date: 1-Sep-2022
Date of Acceptance: 21-Jun-2021
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/93186
DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiab327
ISSN: 0022-1899
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Start Page: 862
End Page: 870
Journal / Book Title: Journal of Infectious Diseases
Volume: 226
Issue: 5
Copyright Statement: © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Sponsor/Funder: Medical Research Council
Gilead Sciences Inc
Funder's Grant Number: 05235
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Immunology
Infectious Diseases
Microbiology
occult hepatitis B
prevalence
advanced liver disease
cirrhosis
hepatocellular carcinoma
Africa
VIRUS INFECTION
HEPATOCELLULAR-CARCINOMA
RISK
TESTS
Africa
advanced liver disease
cirrhosis
hepatocellular carcinoma
occult hepatitis B
prevalence
Humans
Hepatitis B virus
Hepacivirus
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis B, Chronic
Hepatitis C
DNA, Viral
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Prevalence
Adult
Gambia
Africa
Occult hepatitis B
advanced liver disease
cirrhosis
hepatocellular carcinoma
prevalence
Microbiology
06 Biological Sciences
11 Medical and Health Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Conference Place: United States
Online Publication Date: 2021-06-23
Appears in Collections:Department of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction
National Heart and Lung Institute
Faculty of Medicine



This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons