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Neuroenhancement of surgeons during robotic suturing

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Title: Neuroenhancement of surgeons during robotic suturing
Authors: Patel, R
Suwa, Y
Kinross, J
Von Roon, A
Woods, AJ
Darzi, A
Singh, H
Leff, DR
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background The initial phases of robotic surgical skills acquisition are associated with poor technical performance, such as low knot-tensile strength (KTS). Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) can improve force and accuracy in motor tasks but research in surgery is limited to open and laparoscopic tasks in students. More recently, robotic surgery has gained traction and is now the most common approach for certain procedures (e.g. prostatectomy). Early-phase robotic suturing performance is dependent on prefrontal cortex (PFC) activation, and this study aimed to determine whether performance can be improved with prefrontal tDCS. Methods Fifteen surgical residents were randomized to either active then sham tDCS or sham then active tDCS, in two counterbalanced sessions in a double-blind crossover study. Within each session, participants performed a robotic suturing task repeated in three blocks: pre-, intra- and post-tDCS. During the intra-tDCS block, participants were randomized to either active tDCS (2 mA for 15 min) to the PFC or sham tDCS. Primary outcome measures of technical quality included KTS and error scores. Results Significantly faster completion times were observed longitudinally, regardless of active (p < 0.001) or sham stimulation (p < 0.001). KTS was greater following active compared to sham stimulation (median: active = 44.35 N vs. sham = 27.12 N, p < 0.001). A significant reduction in error scores from “pre-” to “post-” (p = 0.029) were only observed in the active group. Conclusion tDCS could reduce error and enhance KTS during robotic suturing and warrants further exploration as an adjunct to robotic surgical training.
Issue Date: 1-Jul-2022
Date of Acceptance: 17-Oct-2021
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/92450
DOI: 10.1007/s00464-021-08823-1
ISSN: 0930-2794
Publisher: Springer
Start Page: 4803
End Page: 4814
Journal / Book Title: Surgical Endoscopy: surgical and interventional techniques
Volume: 36
Copyright Statement: © The Author(s) 2021. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Sponsor/Funder: Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
National Institute of Health Research
National Institute for Health research (NIHR) - Surgery and Surgical Technology BRC Theme
Funder's Grant Number: 1215-20013
RDB04 79560
RD207
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Surgery
Surgical training
Robotic surgery
Transcranial direct-current stimulation
Motor skills
DIRECT-CURRENT STIMULATION
MOTOR CORTEX
TECHNICAL SKILLS
SURGICAL SKILL
TASK
EXCITABILITY
PERFORMANCE
STRENGTH
TDCS
Motor skills
Robotic surgery
Surgical training
Transcranial direct-current stimulation
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Humans
Male
Robotic Surgical Procedures
Robotics
Surgeons
Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation
Humans
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Robotics
Male
Surgeons
Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation
Robotic Surgical Procedures
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Surgery
Surgical training
Robotic surgery
Transcranial direct-current stimulation
Motor skills
DIRECT-CURRENT STIMULATION
MOTOR CORTEX
TECHNICAL SKILLS
SURGICAL SKILL
TASK
EXCITABILITY
PERFORMANCE
STRENGTH
TDCS
Surgery
1103 Clinical Sciences
Online Publication Date: 2021-11-01
Appears in Collections:Department of Surgery and Cancer
Faculty of Medicine
Institute of Global Health Innovation
Department of Brain Sciences



This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons