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Nitric oxide synthase neurons in the preoptic hypothalamus are sleep-active and contribute to regulating NREM and REM sleep and lowering body temperature

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2021.05.14.444161v1.full.pdfWorking paper1.79 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: Nitric oxide synthase neurons in the preoptic hypothalamus are sleep-active and contribute to regulating NREM and REM sleep and lowering body temperature
Authors: Harding, EC
Ba, W
Zahir, R
Yu, X
Yustos, R
Hsieh, B
Lignos, L
Vyssotski, AL
Constandinou, T
Franks, NP
Wisden, W
Item Type: Working Paper
Abstract: When mice are exposed to external warmth, nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) neurons in the median and medial preoptic (MnPO/MPO) hypothalamus induce sleep and concomitant body cooling. However, how these neurons regulate baseline sleep and body temperature is unknown. Using calcium photometry, we show that NOS1 neurons in MnPO/MPO are predominantly NREM active. This is the first instance of a predominantly NREM-active population in the PO area, or to our knowledge, elsewhere in the brain. In addition to releasing nitric oxide, NOS1 neurons in MnPO/MPO can release GABA, glutamate and peptides. We expressed tetanus-toxin light-chain in MnPO/MPO NOS1 cells to reduce vesicular release of transmitters. This induced changes in sleep structure: over 24 hours, mice had less NREM sleep in their dark (active) phase, and more NREM sleep in their light (sleep) phase. REM sleep episodes in the dark phase were longer, and there were fewer REM transitions between other vigilance states. REM sleep had less theta power. Mice with synaptically blocked MnPO/MPO NOS1 neurons were also warmer. In particular, mice were warmer than control mice at the dark-light transition (ZT0), as well as during the dark phase siesta (ZT16-20), where there is usually a body temperature dip. Also, at this siesta point of cooled body temperature, mice usually have more NREM, but mice with synaptically blocked MnPO/MPO NOS1 cells showed reduced NREM sleep at this time. Overall, MnPO/MPO NOS1 neurons promote both NREM and REM sleep and contribute to chronically lowering body temperature, particularly at transitions where the mice normally enter NREM sleep.
Issue Date: 14-May-2021
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/90627
DOI: 10.1101/2021.05.14.444161
Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Copyright Statement: The copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder, who has granted bioRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license.
Publication Status: Published
Open Access location: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.05.14.444161v1.full.pdf
Appears in Collections:Electrical and Electronic Engineering
Faculty of Natural Sciences



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