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Standardised exhaled breath collection for the measurement of exhaled volatile organic compounds by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

Title: Standardised exhaled breath collection for the measurement of exhaled volatile organic compounds by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry
Authors: Bikov, A
Paschalaki, K
Logan-Sinclair, R
Horvath, I
Kharitonov, SA
Barnes, PJ
Usmani, OS
Paredi, P
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background Exhaled breath volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis for airway disease monitoring is promising. However, contrary to nitric oxide the method for exhaled breath collection has not yet been standardized and the effects of expiratory flow and breath-hold have not been sufficiently studied. These manoeuvres may also reveal the origin of exhaled compounds. Methods 15 healthy volunteers (34 ± 7 years) participated in the study. Subjects inhaled through their nose and exhaled immediately at two different flows (5 L/min and 10 L/min) into methylated polyethylene bags. In addition, the effect of a 20 s breath-hold following inhalation to total lung capacity was studied. The samples were analyzed for ethanol and acetone levels immediately using proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometer (PTR-MS, Logan Research, UK). Results Ethanol levels were negatively affected by expiratory flow rate (232.70 ± 33.50 ppb vs. 202.30 ± 27.28 ppb at 5 L/min and 10 L/min, respectively, p < 0.05), but remained unchanged following the breath hold (242.50 ± 34.53 vs. 237.90 ± 35.86 ppb, without and with breath hold, respectively, p = 0.11). On the contrary, acetone levels were increased following breath hold (1.50 ± 0.18 ppm) compared to the baseline levels (1.38 ± 0.15 ppm), but were not affected by expiratory flow (1.40 ± 0.14 ppm vs. 1.49 ± 0.14 ppm, 5 L/min vs. 10 L/min, respectively, p = 0.14). The diet had no significant effects on the gasses levels which showed good inter and intra session reproducibility. Conclusions Exhalation parameters such as expiratory flow and breath-hold may affect VOC levels significantly; therefore standardisation of exhaled VOC measurements is mandatory. Our preliminary results suggest a different origin in the respiratory tract for these two gasses.
Issue Date: 9-Jul-2013
Date of Acceptance: 4-Jul-2013
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/87062
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2466-13-43
ISSN: 1471-2466
Publisher: BioMed Central
Start Page: 1
End Page: 7
Journal / Book Title: BMC Pulmonary Medicine
Volume: 13
Copyright Statement: © 2013 Bikov et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Sponsor/Funder: National Institute for Health Research
Funder's Grant Number: CDF-2011-04-053
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Respiratory System
MULTIBED SORPTION TRAP
NITRIC-OXIDE
LUNG-CANCER
HEALTHY-VOLUNTEERS
SIFT-MS
FLOW
ONLINE
BIOMARKERS
CHROMATOGRAPHY
EXHALATION
Acetone
Adult
Breath Tests
Ethanol
Exhalation
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Reproducibility of Results
Respiratory System
Time Factors
Total Lung Capacity
Volatile Organic Compounds
Respiratory System
Humans
Ethanol
Acetone
Breath Tests
Total Lung Capacity
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Reproducibility of Results
Exhalation
Time Factors
Adult
Female
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Volatile Organic Compounds
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Respiratory System
MULTIBED SORPTION TRAP
NITRIC-OXIDE
LUNG-CANCER
HEALTHY-VOLUNTEERS
SIFT-MS
FLOW
ONLINE
BIOMARKERS
CHROMATOGRAPHY
EXHALATION
Respiratory System
1102 Cardiorespiratory Medicine and Haematology
Publication Status: Published
Article Number: ARTN 43
Online Publication Date: 2013-07-09
Appears in Collections:National Heart and Lung Institute



This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons