3
IRUS Total
Downloads
  Altmetric

Genetic variation in the 15q25 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene cluster (CHRNA5CHRNA3CHRNB4) interacts with maternal self-reported smoking status during pregnancy to influence birth weight

Title: Genetic variation in the 15q25 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene cluster (CHRNA5CHRNA3CHRNB4) interacts with maternal self-reported smoking status during pregnancy to influence birth weight
Authors: Tyrrell, J
Huikari, V
Christie, JT
Cavadino, A
Bakker, R
Brion, M-JA
Geller, F
Paternoster, L
Myhre, R
Potter, C
Johnson, PCD
Ebrahim, S
Feenstra, B
Hartikainen, A-L
Hattersley, AT
Hofman, A
Kaakinen, M
Lowe, LP
Magnus, P
McConnachie, A
Melbye, M
Ng, JWY
Nohr, EA
Power, C
Ring, SM
Sebert, SP
Sengpiel, V
Taal, HR
Watt, GCM
Sattar, N
Relton, CL
Jacobsson, B
Frayling, TM
Srensen, TIA
Murray, JC
Lawlor, DA
Pennell, CE
Jaddoe, VWV
Hypponen, E
Lowe, WL
Jarvelin, M-R
Smith, GD
Freathy, RM
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with low birth weight. Common variation at rs1051730 is robustly associated with smoking quantity and was recently shown to influence smoking cessation during pregnancy, but its influence on birth weight is not clear. We aimed to investigate the association between this variant and birth weight of term, singleton offspring in a well-powered meta-analysis. We stratified 26 241 European origin study participants by smoking status (women who smoked during pregnancy versus women who did not smoke during pregnancy) and, in each stratum, analysed the association between maternal rs1051730 genotype and offspring birth weight. There was evidence of interaction between genotype and smoking (P = 0.007). In women who smoked during pregnancy, each additional smoking-related T-allele was associated with a 20 g [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 4–36 g] lower birth weight (P = 0.014). However, in women who did not smoke during pregnancy, the effect size estimate was 5 g per T-allele (95% CI: −4 to 14 g; P = 0.268). To conclude, smoking status during pregnancy modifies the association between maternal rs1051730 genotype and offspring birth weight. This strengthens the evidence that smoking during pregnancy is causally related to lower offspring birth weight and suggests that population interventions that effectively reduce smoking in pregnant women would result in a reduced prevalence of low birth weight.
Issue Date: 15-Dec-2012
Date of Acceptance: 30-Aug-2012
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/85516
DOI: 10.1093/hmg/dds372
ISSN: 0964-6906
Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
Start Page: 5344
End Page: 5358
Journal / Book Title: Human Molecular Genetics
Volume: 21
Issue: 24
Copyright Statement: © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Sponsor/Funder: Medical Research Council (MRC)
Funder's Grant Number: G0801056B
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Genetics & Heredity
GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
COHORT PROFILE
OUTCOME HAPO
LUNG-CANCER
HEALTH
VARIANT
WOMEN
CHILD
RISK
HYPERGLYCEMIA
Birth Weight
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Humans
Infant
Nerve Tissue Proteins
Pregnancy
Receptors, Nicotinic
Smoking
Early Growth Genetics (EGG) Consortium
Humans
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Birth Weight
Receptors, Nicotinic
Nerve Tissue Proteins
Smoking
Pregnancy
Infant
Female
Genetic Variation
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Genetics & Heredity
GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
COHORT PROFILE
OUTCOME HAPO
LUNG-CANCER
HEALTH
VARIANT
WOMEN
CHILD
RISK
HYPERGLYCEMIA
Genetics & Heredity
06 Biological Sciences
11 Medical and Health Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2012-09-05
Appears in Collections:Department of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction
Faculty of Medicine
School of Public Health



This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons