9
IRUS Total
Downloads

What is the impact of food reformulation on individual’s behaviour, nutrient intakes and health status? A systematic review of empirical evidence

File Description SizeFormat 
obr.13139.pdfPublished version3.35 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: What is the impact of food reformulation on individual’s behaviour, nutrient intakes and health status? A systematic review of empirical evidence
Authors: Gressier, M
Swinburn, B
Frost, G
Segal, A
Sassi, F
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Food reformulation aimed at improving the nutritional properties of food products has long been viewed as a promising public health strategy to tackle poor nutrition and obesity. This paper presents a review of the empirical evidence (i.e. modelling studies were excluded) on the impact of food reformulation on food choices, nutrient intakes and health status, based on a systematic search of Medline, Embase, Global Health, and sources of grey literature. Fifty-nine studies (in 35 papers) were included in the review. Most studies examined food choices (n=27) and dietary intakes (n=26). The nutrients most frequently studied were sodium (n=32) and trans-fatty acids (TFA, n=13). Reformulated products were generally accepted and purchased by consumers, which led to improved nutrient intakes in 73% of studies. We also conducted two meta-analyses showing, respectively, a -0.57g/day [95%CI -0.89, -0.25] reduction in salt intake, and an effect size for TFA intake reduction of -1.2, 95% [CI -1.79, -0.61]. Only six studies examined effects on health outcomes, with studies on TFA reformulation showing overall improvement in cardiovascular risk factors. For other nutrients, it remains unclear whether observed improvements in food choices or nutrient intakes may have led to an improvement in health outcomes.
Issue Date: Feb-2021
Date of Acceptance: 17-Aug-2020
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/82384
DOI: 10.1111/obr.13139
ISSN: 1467-7881
Publisher: Wiley
Start Page: 1
End Page: 23
Journal / Book Title: Obesity Reviews
Volume: 22
Issue: 2
Copyright Statement: © 2020 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity Federation This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Sponsor/Funder: Nestec
Commission of the European Communities
National Institute for Health Research
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
Funder's Grant Number: 77454
NF-SI-0513-10029
RDA27
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Endocrinology & Metabolism
consumer behaviour
food environments
food policy
food reformulation
TRANS-FATTY-ACIDS
NATIONWIDE PRODUCT REFORMULATIONS
SODIUM REDUCTION
PROCESSED FOODS
DIETARY-INTAKE
SALT
CONSUMERS
ACCEPTABILITY
CONSUMPTION
PURCHASES
consumer behaviour
food environments
food policy
food reformulation
Endocrinology & Metabolism
11 Medical and Health Sciences
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2020-10-06
Appears in Collections:Imperial College Business School
Department of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction
Faculty of Medicine



This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons