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Microbiota supplementation with Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus modifies the preterm infant gut microbiota and metabolome: an observational study

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Title: Microbiota supplementation with Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus modifies the preterm infant gut microbiota and metabolome: an observational study
Authors: Kroll, JS
Hall, L
Kiu, R
Shaw, A
Sim, K
Clarke, P
Dalby, MJ
Caim, S
Leclaire, C
Lawson, M
Ketskemety, J
Fardus-Reid, F
Chalken, L
Kujawska, M
Mitra, S
Belted, G
Swann, J
Alcon-Giner, C
McColl, K
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Supplementation with members of the early-life microbiota as “probiotics” is increasingly used in attempts to beneficially manipulate the preterm infant gut microbiota. We performed a large observational longitudinal study comprising two preterm groups: 101 infants orally supplemented with Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus (Bif/Lacto) and 133 infants non-supplemented (control) matched by age, sex, and delivery method. 16S rRNA gene profiling on fecal samples (n = 592) showed a predominance of Bifidobacterium and a lower abundance of pathobionts in the Bif/Lacto group. Metabolomic analysis showed higher fecal acetate and lactate and a lower fecal pH in the Bif/Lacto group compared to the control group. Fecal acetate positively correlated with relative abundance of Bifidobacterium, consistent with the ability of the supplemented Bifidobacterium strain to metabolize human milk oligosaccharides into acetate. This study demonstrates that microbiota supplementation is associated with a Bifidobacterium-dominated preterm microbiota and gastrointestinal environment more closely resembling that of full-term infants.
Issue Date: 25-Aug-2020
Date of Acceptance: 31-Jul-2020
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/82162
DOI: 10.1016/j.xcrm.2020.100077
ISSN: 2666-3791
Publisher: Elsevier
Journal / Book Title: Cell Reports Medicine
Volume: 1
Copyright Statement: This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Publication Status: Published
Article Number: ARTN 100077
Online Publication Date: 2020-08-25
Appears in Collections:Department of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction
Department of Infectious Diseases
Faculty of Medicine
School of Public Health



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