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Mortality from abdominal aortic aneurysm: trends in European Union 15+countries from 1990 to 2017

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Title: Mortality from abdominal aortic aneurysm: trends in European Union 15+countries from 1990 to 2017
Authors: Al-Balah, A
Goodall, R
Salciccioli, JD
Marshall, DC
Shalhoub, J
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background This observational study assessed trends in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) death rates in European Union (EU) 15+ countries for the years 1990 to 2017. Methods Age‐standardized death rates (ASDRs) were extracted from the Global Burden of Disease Study Global Health Data Exchange. Trends were analysed using joinpoint regression analysis. Results Between 1990 and 2017, ASDRs from AAA decreased in all 19 EU15+ countries for women, and in 18 of 19 countries for men. Increasing AAA mortality was observed only for men in Greece (+5·3 per cent). The largest relative decreases in ASDR between 1990 and 2017 were observed in Australia (men –65·6 per cent, women –50·4 per cent) and Canada (men –60·8 per cent, women –48·6 per cent). Over the 28‐year interval, the smallest decreases in ASDR for women were noted in Greece (–2·3 per cent) and in Italy (–2·5 per cent). In 2017, the highest mortality rates were observed in the UK for both men and women (7·5 per 100 000 and 3·7 per 100 000 respectively). The lowest ASDR was observed in Portugal for men (2·8 per 100 000) and in Spain for women (1·0 per 100 000). ASDRs for AAA in 2017 were higher for men than women in all 19 EU15+ countries. The most recent trends demonstrated increasing AAA ASDRs in 14 of 19 countries for both sexes; the increases were relatively small compared with the improvements in the preceding years. Conclusion This observational study identified decreasing mortality from AAA across EU15+ countries since 1990. The most recent trends demonstrated relatively small increases in AAA mortality across the majority of EU15+ countries since 2012.
Issue Date: 1-Oct-2020
Date of Acceptance: 23-Mar-2020
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/79129
DOI: 10.1002/bjs.11635
ISSN: 0007-1323
Publisher: British Journal of Surgery Society
Start Page: 1459
End Page: 1467
Journal / Book Title: British Journal of Surgery
Volume: 107
Issue: 11
Copyright Statement: © 2020 The Authors. British Journal of Surgery published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of BJS Society Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Surgery
ENDOVASCULAR REPAIR
EDITORS CHOICE
FOLLOW-UP
EPIDEMIOLOGY
PREVALENCE
MANAGEMENT
DISEASE
ENGLAND
REDUCE
IMPACT
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Surgery
ENDOVASCULAR REPAIR
EDITORS CHOICE
FOLLOW-UP
EPIDEMIOLOGY
PREVALENCE
MANAGEMENT
DISEASE
ENGLAND
REDUCE
IMPACT
Surgery
11 Medical and Health Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2020-05-11
Appears in Collections:Department of Surgery and Cancer
National Heart and Lung Institute
Faculty of Medicine



This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons