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Quantifying drivers of antibiotic resistance in humans: a systematic review

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Title: Quantifying drivers of antibiotic resistance in humans: a systematic review
Authors: Chatterjee, A
Modarai, M
Naylor, N
Boyd, S
Atun, R
Barlow, J
Holmes, A
Johnson, A
Robotham, J
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Mitigating the risks of antibiotic resistance requires a horizon scan linking the quality with the quantity of data reported on drivers of antibiotic resistance in humans, arising from the human, animal, and environmental reservoirs. We did a systematic review using a One Health approach to survey the key drivers of antibiotic resistance in humans. Two sets of reviewers selected 565 studies from a total of 2819 titles and abstracts identified in Embase, MEDLINE, and Scopus (2005–18), and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and WHO (One Health data). Study quality was assessed in accordance with Cochrane recommendations. Previous antibiotic exposure, underlying disease, and invasive procedures were the risk factors with most supporting evidence identified from the 88 risk factors retrieved. The odds ratios of antibiotic resistance were primarily reported to be between 2 and 4 for these risk factors when compared with their respective controls or baseline risk groups. Food-related transmission from the animal reservoir and water-related transmission from the environmental reservoir were frequently quantified. Uniformly quantifying relationships between risk factors will help researchers to better understand the process by which antibiotic resistance arises in human infections.
Issue Date: 1-Dec-2018
Date of Acceptance: 5-Mar-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/76317
DOI: 10.1016/S1473-3099(18)30296-2
ISSN: 1473-3099
Publisher: Elsevier
Start Page: e368
End Page: e378
Journal / Book Title: The Lancet Infectious Diseases
Volume: 18
Issue: 12
Copyright Statement: © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Sponsor/Funder: Department of Health
Funder's Grant Number: PHSRHF53/IMP
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Infectious Diseases
ESCHERICHIA-COLI
ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE
STAPHYLOCOCCUS-AUREUS
RISK-FACTORS
EXTENDED-SPECTRUM
DRINKING-WATER
PREVALENCE
COLONIZATION
METAANALYSIS
ANIMALS
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteria
Bacterial Infections
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Transmission, Infectious
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Environmental Microbiology
Female
Foodborne Diseases
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk Factors
Young Adult
Humans
Bacteria
Bacterial Infections
Prevalence
Risk Factors
Environmental Microbiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Middle Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Female
Male
Disease Transmission, Infectious
Young Adult
Foodborne Diseases
Microbiology
1103 Clinical Sciences
1108 Medical Microbiology
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2018-08-29
Appears in Collections:Imperial College Business School
School of Public Health