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Shifts in the demographics and behavior of bearded pigs (Sus barbatus) across a land-use gradient

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Title: Shifts in the demographics and behavior of bearded pigs (Sus barbatus) across a land-use gradient
Authors: Davison, CW
Chapman, PM
Wearn, OR
Bernard, H
Ewers, RM
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Beyond broad‐scale investigations of species diversity and abundance, there is little information on how land conversion in the tropics is affecting the behavior and demographics of surviving species. To fill these knowledge gaps, we explored the effects of land‐use change on the ecologically important and threatened bearded pig (Sus barbatus) over seven years in Borneo. Random placement of camera traps across a land‐use gradient of primary forest, logged forest, and oil palm plantations (32,542 trap nights) resulted in 2,303 independent capture events. Land‐use was associated with changes in the age structure and activity patterns of photographed individuals, alongside large changes in abundance shown previously. The proportion of adults recorded declined from 92% in primary forests to 76% in logged forests, and 67% in plantations, likely indicating increased fecundity in secondary forests. Activity level (capture rate) did not vary, but activity patterns changed markedly, from diurnal in primary forests, crepuscular in logged forests, to nocturnal in plantations. These changes corresponded with avoidance of diurnal human activity and may also protect bearded pigs from increased thermal stress in warmer degraded forests. The percentage of adult captures that were groups rather than individuals increased five‐fold from primary forests (4%) to logged forests (20%), possibly due to increased mating or in response to perceived threats from indirect human disturbance. We recommend further investigation of the demographic and behavioral effects of land‐use change on keystone species as altered population structure, activity patterns, and social behavior may have knock‐on effects for entire ecosystems.
Issue Date: 21-Nov-2019
Date of Acceptance: 14-Sep-2019
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/75625
DOI: 10.1111/btp.12724
ISSN: 0006-3606
Publisher: Wiley
Start Page: 938
End Page: 948
Journal / Book Title: Biotropica
Volume: 51
Issue: 6
Copyright Statement: © 2019 The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation. This is the accepted version of the following article: Davison, CW, Chapman, PM, Wearn, OR, Bernard, H, Ewers, RM. Shifts in the demographics and behavior of bearded pigs (Sus barbatus) across a land‐use gradient. Biotropica. 2019; 51: 938– 948, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/ddi.12724
Sponsor/Funder: Rainforest Research Sdn Bhd
Funder's Grant Number: LBEE_P34395
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ecology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
activity pattern
borneo
mammal
oil palm
population structure
primary tropical forest
selective logging
social behavior
ACTIVITY PATTERNS
OIL PALM
TROPICAL FOREST
WILD BOAR
ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION
PREDATION RISK
POPULATION-DYNAMICS
HUMAN DISTURBANCE
AGE STRUCTURE
RAIN-FORESTS
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ecology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
activity pattern
borneo
mammal
oil palm
population structure
primary tropical forest
selective logging
social behavior
ACTIVITY PATTERNS
OIL PALM
TROPICAL FOREST
WILD BOAR
ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION
PREDATION RISK
POPULATION-DYNAMICS
HUMAN DISTURBANCE
AGE STRUCTURE
RAIN-FORESTS
06 Biological Sciences
05 Environmental Sciences
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Ecology
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2019-11-21
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Natural Sciences