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Simulating the midlatitude atmospheric circulation: What might we gain from high-resolution modeling of air-sea interactions?

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Title: Simulating the midlatitude atmospheric circulation: What might we gain from high-resolution modeling of air-sea interactions?
Authors: Czaja, A
Frankignoul, C
Minobe, S
Vanniere, B
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Purpose of Review To provide a snapshot of the current research on the oceanic forcing of the atmospheric circulation in midlatitudes and a concise update on previous review papers. Recent Findings Atmospheric models used for seasonal and longer timescales predictions are starting to resolve motions so far only studied in conjunction with weather forecasts. These phenomena have horizontal scales of ~ 10–100 km which coincide with energetic scales in the ocean circulation. Evidence has been presented that, as a result of this matching of scale, oceanic forcing of the atmosphere was enhanced in models with 10–100 km grid size, especially at upper tropospheric levels. The robustness of these results and their underlying mechanisms are however unclear. Summary Despite indications that higher resolution atmospheric models respond more strongly to sea surface temperature anomalies, their responses are still generally weaker than those estimated empirically from observations. Coarse atmospheric models (grid size greater than 100 km) will miss important signals arising from future changes in ocean circulation unless new parameterizations are developed.
Issue Date: 1-Dec-2019
Date of Acceptance: 1-Nov-2019
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/75149
DOI: 10.1007/s40641-019-00148-5
ISSN: 2198-6061
Publisher: Springer (part of Springer Nature)
Start Page: 390
End Page: 406
Journal / Book Title: Current Climate Change Reports
Volume: 5
Issue: 4
Copyright Statement: © 2019 The Author(s). This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Keywords: Science & Technology
Physical Sciences
Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
Ocean-atmosphere interactions
High-resolution climate modeling
Midlatitude climate dynamics
Sea surface temperature anomalies
WESTERN BOUNDARY CURRENTS
STORM-TRACK RESPONSE
NORTH-ATLANTIC SST
CONDITIONAL SYMMETRIC INSTABILITY
SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALIES
GULF-STREAM
WINTERTIME VARIABILITY
KUROSHIO EXTENSION
MERIDIONAL SHIFTS
CLIMATE
Science & Technology
Physical Sciences
Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
Ocean-atmosphere interactions
High-resolution climate modeling
Midlatitude climate dynamics
Sea surface temperature anomalies
WESTERN BOUNDARY CURRENTS
STORM-TRACK RESPONSE
NORTH-ATLANTIC SST
CONDITIONAL SYMMETRIC INSTABILITY
SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALIES
GULF-STREAM
WINTERTIME VARIABILITY
KUROSHIO EXTENSION
MERIDIONAL SHIFTS
CLIMATE
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2019-11-04
Appears in Collections:Space and Atmospheric Physics
Physics
Centre for Environmental Policy
Faculty of Natural Sciences