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Multi-ancestry sleep-by-SNP interaction analysis in 126,926 individuals reveals lipid loci stratified by sleep duration

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Title: Multi-ancestry sleep-by-SNP interaction analysis in 126,926 individuals reveals lipid loci stratified by sleep duration
Authors: Noordam, R
Evangelou, E
Elliott, P
Redline, S
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Both short and long sleep are associated with an adverse lipid profile, likely through different biological pathways. To elucidate the biology of sleep-associated adverse lipid profile, we conduct multi-ancestry genome-wide sleep-SNP interaction analyses on three lipid traits (HDL-c, LDL-c and triglycerides). In the total study sample (discovery + replication) of 126,926 individuals from 5 different ancestry groups, when considering either long or short total sleep time interactions in joint analyses, we identify 49 previously unreported lipid loci, and 10 additional previously unreported lipid loci in a restricted sample of European-ancestry cohorts. In addition, we identify new gene-sleep interactions for known lipid loci such as LPL and PCSK9. The previously unreported lipid loci have a modest explained variance in lipid levels: most notable, gene-short-sleep interactions explain 4.25% of the variance in triglyceride level. Collectively, these findings contribute to our understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in sleep-associated adverse lipid profiles.
Issue Date: 12-Nov-2019
Date of Acceptance: 4-Oct-2019
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/74403
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-12958-0
ISSN: 1061-4036
Publisher: Nature Research
Journal / Book Title: Nature Genetics
Volume: 10
Copyright Statement: © 2019 The Author(s). This article is licensed under a Creative CommonsAttribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing,adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you giveappropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the CreativeCommons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third partymaterial in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unlessindicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in thearticle’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutoryregulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly fromthe copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visithttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Sponsor/Funder: Home Office
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Medical Research Council (MRC)
UK DRI Ltd
Funder's Grant Number: PG0484
RDF03
MR/R023484/1
MR/L01341X/1
MR/L01632X/1
MR/L01632X/1
4050641385
Publication Status: Published
Article Number: NCOMMS-19-07363B
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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