25
IRUS Total
Downloads
  Altmetric

Do equestrian helmets prevent concussion? A retrospective analysis of head injuries and helmet damage from real-world equestrian accidents

File Description SizeFormat 
Jockey_helmet_concussion.pdfPublished version1.07 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: Do equestrian helmets prevent concussion? A retrospective analysis of head injuries and helmet damage from real-world equestrian accidents
Authors: Connor, TA
Clark, JM
Jayamohan, J
Stewart, M
McGoldrick, A
Williams, C
Seemungal, BM
Smith, R
Burek, R
Gilchrist, MD
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To collect and analyse helmets from real-world equestrian accidents. To record reported head injuries associated with those accidents. To compare damage to helmets certified to different standards and the injuries associated with them. METHODS: Two hundred sixteen equestrian helmets were collected in total. One hundred seventy-six helmets from amateur jockeys were collected via accident helmet return schemes in the UK and USA, while 40 helmets from professional jockeys were collected by The Irish Turf Club. All helmet damage was measured, and associated head injury was recorded. RESULTS: Eighty-eight percent (189) of equestrian fall accidents returned an injury report of which 70% (139) reported a head injury. Fifty-four percent (75) of head injury cases had associated helmet damage while 46% had no helmet damage. Reported head injuries consisted of 91% (126) concussion, 4% (6) skull fractures, 1 (0.7%) subdural hematoma, 1 (0.7%) cerebral edema and 5 (3.6%) diffuse axonal injury (DAI). It is also shown that helmets certified to the most severe standard are overrepresented in this undamaged group (p <0.001). CONCLUSIONS: It is clear that despite jockeys wearing a helmet, large proportions of concussion injuries still occur in the event of a jockey sustaining a fall. However, the data suggest it is likely that helmets reduce the severity of head injury as the occurrence of skull fracture is low. The proportion of undamaged helmets with an associated head injury suggests that many helmets may be too stiff relative to the surface they are impacting to reduce the risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI). It may be possible to improve helmet designs and certification tests to reduce the risk of head injury in low-severity impacts.
Issue Date: 24-May-2019
Date of Acceptance: 14-May-2019
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/72184
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40798-019-0193-0
ISSN: 2198-9761
Publisher: Springer (part of Springer Nature)
Start Page: 19
End Page: 19
Journal / Book Title: Sports Medicine - Open
Volume: 5
Issue: 1
Copyright Statement: © The Author(s). 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, andreproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link tothe Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made
Sponsor/Funder: Medical Research Council (MRC)
National Institute for Health Research
National Institute for Health Research
(US) Department of Defense Defense Health Program, Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs
Racing Foundation
The Racing Foundation
Imperial Health Charity
National Institute for Health Research
Funder's Grant Number: MR/P006493/1
RDA26
ICA-CDRF-2017-03-070
197/229
GG1516\100028
ICA-CDRF-2017-03-070
Keywords: Certification standards
Concussion
Equestrian
Head injury
Helmet
Riding
Certification standards
Concussion
Equestrian
Head injury
Helmet
Riding
Publication Status: Published
Conference Place: Switzerland
Appears in Collections:Department of Medicine (up to 2019)