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Tropical logging and deforestation impacts multiple scales of weevil beta-diversity

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Title: Tropical logging and deforestation impacts multiple scales of weevil beta-diversity
Authors: Sharp, AC
Barclay, MVL
Chung, AYC
Ewers, RM
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Half of Borneo's forest has been logged and oil palm plantations have replaced millions of hectares of forest since the 1970's. While this extensive land-use change has been shown to reduce species richness across landscapes, there is limited current knowledge on how deforestation affects the spatial arrangement of ecological communities. Identifying responses of beta-diversity to land-use change may reveal processes which could mitigate total biodiversity loss. We sampled weevils (superfamily: Curculionoidea) at multiple spatial scales across a land-use gradient at the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) Project in Sabah, Malaysia, in 2011–2012. We caught 160 taxa of weevil and calculated the response of alpha-diversity (1-ha scale) and beta-diversity (10-, 100-, and 1000-ha scales) to disturbance. Alpha-diversity of weevils was greatest in unlogged forest but landscape-level beta-diversity (100- and 1000-ha scale) was maintained across logged and unlogged due to high rates of spatial turnover. Turnover at smallest spatial scales (10-ha) in unlogged forest was highest in rough, flat terrain but smooth, sloping terrain had highest turnover in logged forest. Logging of flat terrain at small spatial scales has potential to decrease beta-diversity at greater scales. Beta-diversity at landscape-level in oil palm plantation remained high but was propagated by abundance shifts of few species instead of spatial turnover of many species. High temporal beta-diversity in unlogged forest was evident through periodic fluxes in abundance of many weevil species. We conclude that unlogged forest is irreplaceable for high beetle biodiversity but increased spatial turnover in some terrains may help conserve beetle communities in heavily-degraded landscapes.
Issue Date: 1-Jun-2019
Date of Acceptance: 15-Mar-2019
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/70986
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2019.03.024
ISSN: 0006-3207
Publisher: Elsevier
Start Page: 172
End Page: 179
Journal / Book Title: Biological Conservation
Volume: 234
Copyright Statement: © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.
Sponsor/Funder: Rainforest Research Sdn Bhd
Funder's Grant Number: LBEE_P34395
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biodiversity Conservation
Ecology
Environmental Sciences
Biodiversity & Conservation
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Beetles
Conservation
Logging
Oil palm plantations
Topography
Tropical forests
OIL PALM
HABITAT HETEROGENEITY
FOREST FRAGMENTATION
SPECIES RICHNESS
NORTHERN BORNEO
RAIN-FORESTS
BIODIVERSITY
MICROCLIMATE
DEGRADATION
COMMUNITIES
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biodiversity Conservation
Ecology
Environmental Sciences
Biodiversity & Conservation
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Beetles
Conservation
Logging
Oil palm plantations
Topography
Tropical forests
OIL PALM
HABITAT HETEROGENEITY
FOREST FRAGMENTATION
SPECIES RICHNESS
NORTHERN BORNEO
RAIN-FORESTS
BIODIVERSITY
MICROCLIMATE
DEGRADATION
COMMUNITIES
Ecology
05 Environmental Sciences
06 Biological Sciences
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2019-03-29
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Natural Sciences