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International Cancer Microbiome Consortium consensus statement on the role of the human microbiome in carcinogenesis

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Title: International Cancer Microbiome Consortium consensus statement on the role of the human microbiome in carcinogenesis
Authors: Scott, AJ
Alexander, JL
Merrifield, CA
Cunningham, D
Jobin, C
Brown, R
Alverdy, J
O'Keefe, SJ
Gaskins, HR
Teare, J
Yu, J
Hughes, DJ
Verstraelen, H
Burton, J
O'Toole, PW
Rosenberg, DW
Marchesi, JR
Kinross, JM
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Objective In this consensus statement, an international panel of experts deliver their opinions on key questions regarding the contribution of the human microbiome to carcinogenesis. Design International experts in oncology and/or microbiome research were approached by personal communication to form a panel. A structured, iterative, methodology based around a 1-day roundtable discussion was employed to derive expert consensus on key questions in microbiome-oncology research. Results Some 18 experts convened for the roundtable discussion and five key questions were identified regarding: (1) the relevance of dysbiosis/an altered gut microbiome to carcinogenesis; (2) potential mechanisms of microbiota-induced carcinogenesis; (3) conceptual frameworks describing how the human microbiome may drive carcinogenesis; (4) causation versus association; and (5) future directions for research in the field. The panel considered that, despite mechanistic and supporting evidence from animal and human studies, there is currently no direct evidence that the human commensal microbiome is a key determinant in the aetiopathogenesis of cancer. The panel cited the lack of large longitudinal, cohort studies as a principal deciding factor and agreed that this should be a future research priority. However, while acknowledging gaps in the evidence, expert opinion was that the microbiome, alongside environmental factors and an epigenetically/genetically vulnerable host, represents one apex of a tripartite, multidirectional interactome that drives carcinogenesis. Conclusion Data from longitudinal cohort studies are needed to confirm the role of the human microbiome as a key driver in the aetiopathogenesis of cancer.
Issue Date: 1-Aug-2019
Date of Acceptance: 24-Apr-2019
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/70313
DOI: 10.1136/gutjnl-2019-318556
ISSN: 0017-5749
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Start Page: 1624
End Page: 1632
Journal / Book Title: Gut
Volume: 68
Copyright Statement: © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
Sponsor/Funder: Cancer Research UK
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust- BRC Funding
Funder's Grant Number: 25165
RDA27
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Gastroenterology & Hepatology
FUSOBACTERIUM-NUCLEATUM
COLORECTAL-CANCER
MECHANISMS
BACTERIA
ADENOCARCINOMA
TUMORIGENESIS
METABOLISM
DIVERSITY
DISEASE
BINDING
microbiome, cancer, colorectal, oncology, consensus
Animals
Biomedical Research
Carcinogenesis
Colorectal Neoplasms
DNA Damage
Dysbiosis
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Humans
Inflammation
Microbiota
Neoplasms
Animals
Humans
Neoplasms
Colorectal Neoplasms
DNA Damage
Inflammation
Biomedical Research
Microbiota
Carcinogenesis
Dysbiosis
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
1103 Clinical Sciences
1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
Gastroenterology & Hepatology
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2019-05-15
Appears in Collections:Department of Surgery and Cancer