Altmetric

The temporal dynamics and infectiousness of subpatent Plasmodium falciparum infections in relation to parasite density

File Description SizeFormat 
s41467-019-09441-1.pdfPublished version1.47 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
submicro_supp_revision_FINAL3.docxSupplementary information1.55 MBMicrosoft WordView/Open
Title: The temporal dynamics and infectiousness of subpatent Plasmodium falciparum infections in relation to parasite density
Authors: Slater, H
Ross, A
Felger, I
Hofmann, N
Robinson, L
Cook, J
Goncalves
Bjorkman
Ouedraogo
Morris
Msellem
Koepfli
Mueller
Tadesse
Gadisa
Das
Domingo
Kapulu
Midega, J
Owusu-Agyei
Nabet
Piarroux
Doumbo
Doumbo
Koram
Lucchi
Udhayakumar
Mosha
Tiono
Chandramohan
Gosling
Mwingira
Sauerwein
Riley
White
Nosten
Imwong
Bousema
Drakeley
Okell, L
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Malaria infections occurring below the limit of detection of standard diagnostics are common in all endemic settings. However, key questions remain surrounding their contribution to sustaining transmission and whether they need to be detected and targeted to achieve malaria elimination. In this study we analyse a range of malaria datasets to quantify the density, detectability, course of infection and infectiousness of subpatent infections. Asymptomatically infected individuals have lower parasite densities on average in low transmission settings compared to individuals in higher transmission settings. In cohort studies, subpatent infections are found to be predictive of future periods of patent infection and in membrane feeding studies, individuals infected with subpatent asexual parasite densities are found to be approximately a third as infectious to mosquitoes as individuals with patent (asexual parasite) infection. These results indicate that subpatent infections contribute to the infectious reservoir, may be long lasting, and require more sensitive diagnostics to detect them in lower transmission settings.
Issue Date: 29-Mar-2019
Date of Acceptance: 7-Mar-2019
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/68730
DOI: https:///dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-09441-1
ISSN: 2041-1723
Publisher: Nature Research (part of Springer Nature)
Journal / Book Title: Nature Communications
Volume: 10
Copyright Statement: © 2019 The Author(s). This article is licensed under a Creative CommonsAttribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing,adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you giveappropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the CreativeCommons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third partymaterial in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unlessindicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in thearticle’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutoryregulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly fromthe copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visithttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Sponsor/Funder: Medical Research Council (MRC)
Medicines for Malaria Venture
The Royal Society
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Funder's Grant Number: MR/K010174/1B
PO14/00561
DH140134
MR/R015600/1
Keywords: MD Multidisciplinary
Publication Status: Published
Article Number: ARTN 1433
Appears in Collections:Centre for Environmental Policy
Faculty of Medicine
Faculty of Natural Sciences
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



Items in Spiral are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Creative Commons