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Bridging drought experiment and modeling: Representing the differential sensitivities of leaf gas exchange to drought

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Zhou et al. 2019 Frontiers-Bridging Drought Experiment and Modeling.pdfPublished version1.12 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: Bridging drought experiment and modeling: Representing the differential sensitivities of leaf gas exchange to drought
Authors: Zhou, S-X
Prentice, IC
Medlyn, BE
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Global climate change is expected to increase drought duration and intensity in certain regions while increasing rainfall in others. The quantitative consequences of increased drought for ecosystems are not easy to predict. Process-based models must be informed by experiments to determine the resilience of plants and ecosystems from different climates. Here, we demonstrate what and how experimentally derived quantitative information can improve the representation of stomatal and non-stomatal photosynthetic responses to drought in large-scale vegetation models. In particular, we review literature on the answers to four key questions: (1) Which photosynthetic processes are affected under short-term drought? (2) How do the stomatal and non-stomatal responses to short-term drought vary among species originating from different hydro-climates? (3) Do plants acclimate to prolonged water stress, and do mesic and xeric species differ in their degree of acclimation? (4) Does inclusion of experimentally based plant functional type specific stomatal and non-stomatal response functions to drought help Land Surface Models to reproduce key features of ecosystem responses to drought? We highlighted the need for evaluating model representations of the fundamental eco-physiological processes under drought. Taking differential drought sensitivity of different vegetation into account is necessary for Land Surface Models to accurately model drought responses, or the drought impacts on vegetation in drier environments may be over-estimated.
Issue Date: 15-Jan-2019
Date of Acceptance: 18-Dec-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/66205
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2018.01965
ISSN: 1664-462X
Publisher: Frontiers Media
Journal / Book Title: Frontiers in Plant Science
Volume: 9
Copyright Statement: © 2019 Zhou, Prentice and Medlyn. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY - https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Sponsor/Funder: AXA Research Fund
Commission of the European Communities
Funder's Grant Number: AXA Chair Programme in Biosphere and Climate Impacts
787203
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Plant Sciences
photosynthesis
stomatal and non-stomatal limitation
mesophyll conductance
V-cmax
J(max)
drought acclimation
flux measurement
land surface model
TERM WATER-STRESS
OPTIMAL STOMATAL CONDUCTANCE
DECREASED RUBISCO ACTIVITY
MESOPHYLL CONDUCTANCE
QUERCUS-ILEX
HYDRAULIC TRAITS
TREE MORTALITY
CLIMATE-CHANGE
PHOTOSYNTHETIC CAPACITY
NONSTOMATAL LIMITATIONS
Publication Status: Published
Article Number: 1965
Online Publication Date: 2019-01-15
Appears in Collections:Department of Life Sciences
Faculty of Natural Sciences