32
IRUS Total
Downloads

Autophagy-Virus Interplay: From Cell Biology to Human Disease

File Description SizeFormat 
fcell-06-00155.pdfPublished version1.14 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: Autophagy-Virus Interplay: From Cell Biology to Human Disease
Authors: Ahmad, L
Mostowy, S
Sancho-Shimizu, V
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Autophagy is a highly conserved intracellular degradation process that targets protein aggregates and damaged organelles. Autophagy is also implicated in numerous viral infections, including human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), influenza A (IAV) and herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1). Depending on the virus, autophagy can restrict or promote viral replication, and play key roles in modulating inflammation and cell survival. In this review, we consider examples of autophagy-virus interplay, highlighting the protective role of autophagy in human infections. We summarize recent discoveries and emerging themes illuminating autophagy’s role in immunity and inflammation upon viral infection. Finally, we discuss future prospects and therapeutic implications, and potential caveats associated with using autophagy to control viral infections in humans.
Issue Date: 19-Nov-2018
Date of Acceptance: 31-Oct-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/64749
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcell.2018.00155
ISSN: 2296-634X
Publisher: Frontiers Media
Journal / Book Title: Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology
Volume: 6
Copyright Statement: © 2018 Ahmad, Mostowy and Sancho-Shimizu. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Sponsor/Funder: Medical Research Foundation
Funder's Grant Number: C0483
Publication Status: Published
Article Number: 155
Online Publication Date: 2018-11-19
Appears in Collections:Department of Medicine (up to 2019)