Does global drug innovation correspond to burden of disease? The neglected diseases in developed and developing countries

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Title: Does global drug innovation correspond to burden of disease? The neglected diseases in developed and developing countries
Authors: Miraldo, M
Barrenho, E
Smith, P
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: While it is commonly argued that there is a mismatch between drug innovation and disease burden, there is little evidence on the magnitude and direction of such disparities. In this paper we measure inequality in innovation, by comparing R&D activity with population health and GDP data across 493 therapeutic indications to globally measure: (i) drug innovation, (ii) disease burden, and (iii) market size. We use concentration curves and indices to assess inequality at two levels: (i) broad disease groups; and (ii) disease subcategories for both 1990 and 2010. For some of top burden disease subcategories (i.e. cardiovascular and circulatory diseases, neoplasms, and musculoskeletal disorders) innovation is disproportionately concentrated in diseases with high burden and larger market size, whereas for others (i.e. mental and behavioural disorders, neonatal disorders, and neglected tropical diseases) innovation is disproportionately concentrated in low burden diseases. These inequalities persisted over time, suggesting inertia in pharmaceutical R&D in tackling the global health challenges. Our results confirm quantitatively assertions about the mismatch between disease burden and pharmaceutical innovation in both developed and developing countries and highlight the disease areas for which morbidity and mortality remain unaddressed.
Issue Date: 1-Jul-2017
Date of Acceptance: 23-Aug-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/63877
ISSN: 1057-9230
Publisher: Wiley
Journal / Book Title: Health Economics
Keywords: 14 Economics
11 Medical And Health Sciences
Health Policy & Services
Publication Status: Accepted
Appears in Collections:Imperial College Business School



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