Community-based malaria screening and treatment for pregnant women receiving standard intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine: a multicentre (The Gambia, Burkina Faso and Benin) cluster randomised controlled trial

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Title: Community-based malaria screening and treatment for pregnant women receiving standard intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine: a multicentre (The Gambia, Burkina Faso and Benin) cluster randomised controlled trial
Authors: COSMIC CONSORTIUM
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Background We investigated whether adding community scheduled malaria screening and treatment (CSST) with artemether-lumefantrine by community health workers (CHWs) to standard intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP) would improve maternal and infant health. Methods In this 2-arm cluster-randomized, controlled trial, villages in Burkina Faso, The Gambia, and Benin were randomized to receive CSST plus IPTp-SP or IPTp-SP alone. CHWs in the intervention arm performed monthly CSST during pregnancy. At each contact, filter paper and blood slides were collected, and at delivery, a placental biopsy was collected. Primary and secondary endpoints were the prevalence of placental malaria, maternal anemia, maternal peripheral infection, low birth weight, antenatal clinic (ANC) attendance, and IPTp-SP coverage. Results Malaria infection was detected at least once for 3.8% women in The Gambia, 16.9% in Benin, and 31.6% in Burkina Faso. There was no difference between study arms in terms of placenta malaria after adjusting for birth season, parity, and IPTp-SP doses (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06 [95% confidence interval, .78–1.44]; P = .72). No difference between the study arms was found for peripheral maternal infection, anemia, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. ANC attendance was significantly higher in the intervention arm in Burkina Faso but not in The Gambia and Benin. Increasing number of IPTp-SP doses was associated with a significantly lower risk of placenta malaria, anemia at delivery, and low birth weight. Conclusions Adding CSST to existing IPTp-SP strategies did not reduce malaria in pregnancy. Increasing the number of IPTp-SP doses given during pregnancy is a priority. Clinical Trials Registration NCT01941264; ISRCTN37259296.
Issue Date: 15-Feb-2019
Date of Acceptance: 27-Jun-2018
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/62816
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciy522
ISSN: 1058-4838
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Start Page: 586
End Page: 596
Journal / Book Title: Clinical Infectious Diseases
Volume: 68
Issue: 4
Copyright Statement: © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Sponsor/Funder: Commission of the European Communities
Medical Research Council (MRC)
Funder's Grant Number: 305662
MR/R015600/1
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Immunology
Infectious Diseases
Microbiology
malaria
pregnancy
sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine
artemether-lumefantrine
community-based malaria screening
SYSTEMATIC ANALYSIS
AFRICA
BURDEN
INFANT
ANEMIA
HEALTH
IMPACT
COSMIC Consortium
Microbiology
06 Biological Sciences
11 Medical and Health Sciences
Publication Status: Published
Online Publication Date: 2018-06-29
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Medicine
Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care



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