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Topological defects in quantum field theory with matrix product states

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Title: Topological defects in quantum field theory with matrix product states
Authors: Gillman, E
Rajantie, A
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Topological defects (kinks) in a relativistic $\phi^{4}$ scalar field theory in $D=(1+1)$ are studied using the matrix product state tensor network. The one kink state is approximated as a matrix product state and the kink mass is calculated. The approach used is quite general and can be applied to a variety of theories and tensor networks. Additionally, the contribution of kink-antikink excitations to the ground state is examined and a general method to estimate the scalar mass from equal time ground state observables is provided. The scalar and kink mass are compared at strong coupling and behave as expected from universality arguments. This suggests that the matrix product state can adequately capture the physics of defect-antidefect excitations and thus provides a promising technique to study challenging non-equilibrium physics such as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism of defect formation.
Issue Date: 21-Nov-2017
Date of Acceptance: 25-Jun-2017
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/54362
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.96.094509
ISSN: 1550-2368
Publisher: American Physical Society
Journal / Book Title: Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology
Volume: 96
Copyright Statement: © 2017 American Physical Society.
Sponsor/Funder: Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC)
Funder's Grant Number: ST/L00044X/1
Keywords: quant-ph
hep-lat
0201 Astronomical And Space Sciences
0202 Atomic, Molecular, Nuclear, Particle And Plasma Physics
0206 Quantum Physics
Nuclear & Particles Physics
Notes: 17 pages, 6 figures ; v2: typos corrected, reference added
Publication Status: Published
Article Number: 094509
Appears in Collections:Physics
Theoretical Physics
Faculty of Natural Sciences



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