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‘Does Body Mass Index affect mortality in coronary surgery? ’

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Title: ‘Does Body Mass Index affect mortality in coronary surgery? ’
Authors: Protopapas, AD
Ashrafian, H
Athanasiou, A
Item Type: Conference Paper
Abstract: Obesity, expressed as high Body Mass Index (BMI), is a strong risk factor for mediastinitis after CABG, a complication increasing the operative mortality of CABG (OM-CABG) by 20 times. A relevant question was addressed according to a structured protocol: In patients undergoing CABG, how does BMI affect mortality?? 18 retrospective studies with 1,027,711 patients represented the best evidence. We found that mortality of CABG is 3.5 times higher for undernourished and 1.3 times for overnourished patients. The mortality of the patients of normal weight was only one decimal point below that of the morbidly (severely) obese and a half of that of the undernourished. OM-CABG is higher for undernourished and highly over nourished (morbidly -severely obese) patients. A study of propensity matched individuals would quantify the optimum BMI range for CABG.
Issue Date: 14-Sep-2012
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/51022
Copyright Statement: © Aristotle D. Protopapas; Licensee Bentham Open. This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 4.0 International Public License (CC BY-NC 4.0) ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/legalcode ), which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.
Conference Name: 2nd world cardiovascular, diabetes, and obesity online conference
Keywords: Body Mass Index
Coronary Artery Bypass
Evidence based medicine
Mortality
Obesity
Risk stratification
1102 Cardiovascular Medicine And Haematology
Publication Status: Accepted
Start Date: 2012-09-14
Finish Date: 2012-09-16
Conference Place: online
Appears in Collections:Department of Surgery and Cancer