Experiments on stainless steel hollow sections - Part 1: Material and cross-sectional behaviour

Title: Experiments on stainless steel hollow sections - Part 1: Material and cross-sectional behaviour
Authors: Gardner, L
Nethercot, DA
Item Type: Journal Article
Abstract: Basic material properties and cross-sectional data (stress–strain curves and load–end shortening curves) are presented for square, rectangular and circular hollow section specimens in Grade 1.4301 stainless steel. The material tests cover flat material in tension and in compression as well as corner material in tension. Modifications to the Ramberg–Osgood representation are suggested to ensure a close fit to both tensile and compressive behaviour over the full range of strains of interest. Results, including full load–end shortening curves, for a total of 37 stub column tests have been presented. The results have been used to develop an explicit relationship between cross-sectional slenderness and cross-sectional deformation capacity, which forms the basis for a proposed new design approach for stainless steel structures.
Issue Date: 28-Jan-2004
Date of Acceptance: 18-Nov-2003
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/49312
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcsr.2003.11.006
ISSN: 0143-974X
Publisher: Elsevier
Start Page: 1291
End Page: 1318
Journal / Book Title: Journal of Constructional Steel Research
Volume: 60
Issue: 9
Copyright Statement: © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Keywords: Science & Technology
Technology
Construction & Building Technology
Engineering, Civil
Engineering
CONSTRUCTION & BUILDING TECHNOLOGY
ENGINEERING, CIVIL
stainless steel
stress-strain
cross-section
hollow section
tests
stub column
structures
design
MEMBERS
0905 Civil Engineering
Civil Engineering
Publication Status: Published
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering



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