An optrode with built-in self-diagnostic and fracture sensor for cortical brain stimulation

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Title: An optrode with built-in self-diagnostic and fracture sensor for cortical brain stimulation
Authors: Ramezani, R
Dehkhoda, F
Soltan, A
Degenaar, P
Liu, Y
Constandinou, TG
Item Type: Conference Paper
Abstract: This paper proposes a self-diagnostic subsystem for a new generation of brain implants with active electronics. The primary objective of such probes is to deliver optical pulses to optogenetic tissue and record the subsequent activity, but lifetime is currently unknown. Our proposed circuits aim to increase the safety of implanting active electronic probes into human brain tissue. Therefore, prolonging the lifetime of the implant and reducing the risks to the patient. The self-diagnostic circuit will examine the optical emitter against any abnormality or malfunctioning. The fracture sensor examines the optrode against any rapture or insertion breakage. The optrode including our diagnostic subsystem and fracture sensor has been designed and successfully simulated at 350nm AMS technology node and sent for manufacture.
Issue Date: 17-Oct-2016
Date of Acceptance: 10-Aug-2016
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/42258
Publisher: IEEE
Start Page: 392
End Page: 395
Copyright Statement: © 2016 IEEE. This paper is embargoed until publication.
Sponsor/Funder: Wellcome Trust
Engineering & Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC)
Funder's Grant Number: BH134389
EP/M020975/1
Conference Name: IEEE Biomedical Circuits and Systems (BioCAS) Conference
Publication Status: Accepted
Start Date: 2016-10-17
Finish Date: 2016-10-19
Conference Place: Shanghai, China
Embargo Date: publication subject to indefinite embargo
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Engineering
Electrical and Electronic Engineering



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